Sample Scholarship Essays

Brave New World

Imagine what the world would be like if we were all “under the iron curtain.” In his foreword to the novel Brave New World, Aldous Huxley envisioned this statement when he wrote: “To make them love it is the task assigned, in present-day totalitarian states, to ministries of propaganda….” Thus, through hypnopaedic teaching (brainwashing), mandatory attendance to community gatherings, and allusions to prominent political dictators, Huxley bitterly satirized totalitarian propaganda and political technique to point out the problems of a dystopian society.
The way the fascist and totalitarian regimes used mass propaganda techniques to brainwash their people was nearly identical to the way Huxley described the hypnopaedic teachings in his novel. He also thought, however, that the present-day totalitarian states’ methods were still “crude and unscientific.” For example, in the novel the different classes had been brainwashed since birth to believe that they all contributed equally to society. Therefore, the people wouldn’t go against the World Controllers because they had never been trained to think anything differently. In addition, they didn’t have any knowledge of a society which they could compare themselves. This was evident in the saying “History is bunk.” Similarly, the totalitarian dictators attempted to control but failed because they weren’t able to persuade the entire world to think like them. In addition, Communism attempted to rewrite history, but the society in Brave New World took the next step and forgot about history altogether. The only people who had access to any knowledge of the past were the ones who had the power: the World Controllers. Thus, they were able to create a stable society.


Since the hypnopaedic ideas in the society were continuously repeated throughout one’s lifetime, mandatory attendance to community gatherings, such as the Solidarity Service, were strictly enforced. The main purpose of the Solidarity Service was to promote social stability. The people were driven to this idea by singing songs like the First Solidarity Hymn, which began, “Ford, we are twelve oh, make us one.” During this time, people were also consuming soma rations, which drugged them and caused them to get swept up in the service. Consequently, at the end an orgy took place, which brought them together as one being. In comparison, the political rallies Hitler and other fascists held served a similar purpose. Just as people would chant “Hail Hitler” at these mass rallies, people in the novel would also chant their idol’s name, Ford, during the Solidarity Services.
Although these uses of political satire are evident, the most obvious are Huxley’s allusions to the prominent totalitarian dictators. Bernard Marx, for example, was used as an allusion to Karl Marx, the founder of socialism. Socialism’s main idea was that no one had individual property. Likewise, the hypnopaedic proverb “Everyone belongs to everyone else” kept the society from becoming attached to one particular individual. Huxley also included allusions to other totalitarian dictators to show how the society in the novel was closer to a fascist dystopian society instead of the perfect world they perceived. For example, Lenina, who briefly dated Bernard, was an allusion to Lenin, the founder of the Communist Party. Contrary to socialism, communism is a society controlled by a few elite. Likewise, the Ten World Controllers controlled the society in Brave New World. Finally, Benito Hoover alluded to Benito Mussolini, a dictator of Italy, in the novel. Mussolini’s name was included to reinforce the ideas of socialism that were brought out in the novel.
In conclusion, Huxley satirized political tactics and leaders in his discussion of hypnopaedic teachings, community gatherings, and allusions to certain political figures. It is nearly impossible to imagine our world “under the iron curtain.” Huxley, however, was able to shape a realistic society through his broad knowledge of fascist ideas. Thus, the reader was able to point out the problems associated with a dystopian society.

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Brave New World

Brave New World Chemistry is an important key to achieving a world of Community, Identity, and Stability in Aldous Huxleys novel, Brave New World. Huxley himself said that the main theme of his novel is not the advancement of science as such; it is the advancement of science as it affects human individuals. Huxley was obviously rather concerned with the use and misuse of science. As to getting his point of the amazing advancement of science across, Huxley uses a lot of detail in his settings. He uses the decanting process, the conveyor belt at the Hatchery, chemical persuasion, and the new terminology, such as the Bokanovsky Process, involved in just about everything.

In a way, I see it as Huxley trying to tell us that too many great leaps in science can lead to human lethargy, taking-everything-for-granted, and forgetting real human values. While science is not quite the physical downfall of men, and it does increase material pleasures, it eats away at what makes us human. The very values and morals we have held close for generations are swept away at the enticing prospect of a vacation with soma and living only for comforts. Chemical persuasion has been used in this society to control the men and women to make them more sensitive to suggestion. Science, according to Huxley, is a necessary evil today, which will grow to uncontrollable yet irrefutable stature in society. He uses his novel to criticize our obsession with science over moral values.

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The setting of Brave New World uses science and chemistry to justify and establish a society designed by eugenics to improve the quality of the human race in breeding. People poisoned as fetuses perform menial, low paid work. As the Director says, Epsilon workers must have an Epsilon heritage, as well as an Epsilon environment. He voices the assumption that Epsilon embryos are genetically inferior. Even the happiness is drug-induced by a drug called soma. Whenever anything upsetting occurs the society has been trained to reach for their soma. There never any instability because once something goes wrong there is the possibility of going on a soma-holiday.

The very idea of Neo-Pavlovian Conditioning was used to create a society of Community, Identity, and Stability. A community in which the idea of individualism and independent thought are dangerous to the balance of society. As soon as someone starts to have individualistic thoughts they’re shipped off to an island. An identity where chemistry is used to make everyone be thought of as part of a group in their own class system. I don’t like Gamma’s. They wear green.

I’m glad I’m not an alpha, they do so much work but that’s because they’re so bright. Everyone in the society knows exactly who he or she is and what he or she likes. There is no questioning. Everything is certain and the same in their own class system. A stability in the society is to keep the civilized world strong enough to resist the outside reservation life not living by the same standards. English Essays.

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